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Posts Tagged ‘IEEE’

Today, I was pleased to learn that my paper was selected for inclusion in a special issue of the Journal of Signal Processing Systems on the “Top Picks from the SiPS 2010”. The issue assembles extended versions of the top 7-10 selected papers from the 2010 IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing Systems (SiPS), which took place last year in October, 2010.

Co-authored with my doctoral adviser, Prof. Earl E. Swartzlander, Jr., the paper is titled Tunable Mismatch Shaping for Quadrature Bandpass Delta-Sigma Data Converters and presents a technique that allows the center frequency of the mismatch noise shaping transfer function through a quadrature bandpass delta-sigma DAC to be adjustable over the entire Nyquist range.

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This week, I presented a paper entitled Tunable Mismatch Shaping for Quadrature Bandpass Delta-Sigma Data Converters at the 2010 IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing Systems. This paper extends mismatch-shaping methods to quadrature data converters, and is co-authored with my doctoral advisor, Prof. Earl E. Swartzlander, Jr. The conference was held at the Cypress hotel in Cupertino, California. The presentation took place on Thursday, October 7, during Lecture Session 3: Application-Specific Signal Processing Architectures.

From the abstract:

Quadrature bandpass delta-sigma data converters are widely used in low-IF receiver applications where high linearity is required over a narrow bandwidth. A quadrature delta-sigma modulator with multibit quantization requires a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) for each of the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) paths. Device mismatch errors in the DAC can seriously degrade overall converter performance by adding I/Q path-mismatch and distortion. Mismatch noise shaping is an established technique for overcoming these limitations in a complex DAC, but usually anchors the signal band to a fixed frequency location. In order to apply mismatch shaping to applications that require tunable signal band locations, this paper presents a technique that allows the center frequency of the mismatch noise shaping transfer function through the complex DAC to be adjustable over the entire Nyquist range.

A pre-print version of the paper can be downloaded from here (pdf).

Edit-2011: The paper is now available on IEEExplore.

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Another paper has been accepted for presentation at the 2010 IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing Systems (SiPS), taking place in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, from October 6-8, 2010. Co-authored with my doctoral adviser, Prof. Earl E. Swartzlander, Jr., the paper is titled Tunable Mismatch Shaping for Quadrature Bandpass Delta-Sigma Data Converters.

This paper presents a technique that allows the center frequency of the mismatch noise shaping transfer function through a quadrature (complex-valued) bandpass delta-sigma DAC to be adjustable over the entire Nyquist range.

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Today was spent preparing and presenting my paper (co-authored with my doctoral adviser, Prof. Earl E. Swartzlander, Jr.) entitled A novel technique for Tunable Mismatch Shaping in Oversampled Digital-to-Analog Converters, during a poster session at the 2010 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP). The poster session was titled DISPS-P1: Analog and Digital Signal Processing Systems, and provided an opportunity to spend time with researchers working on many other interesting topics. My poster was positioned right next to Professor Mark Arnold, who was presenting his poster on Implementing LNS using Filtering Units of GPUs, and I was quite fascinated to hear that GPUs were now being leveraged for real-time co-processing applications in order to eke out more processor performance.

Located in the heart of downtown Dallas, the Sheraton hotel is as unexciting a conference hotel as they come, with more than adequate facilities for big gatherings, but little else on offer. it didn’t help that the limited selection of restaurants and coffee shops in the vicinity left much to be desired. The conference itself was quite well-attended, and as is to be expected, with a very significant proportion of papers and posters having to do with speech and audio processing. The word of the day was most certainly Compressive Sensing (CS), an area of research pioneered at my alma mater, Rice University, and the talks featuring CS were by far the most heavily-attended.

I enjoyed the experience of presenting my research to others, particularly those whose work was so far removed from mine that I found myself resorting to first principles in order to convey the fundamental ideas. A pre-publication version of the paper can be downloaded here (pdf).

From the abstract:

Over-sampled digital-to-analog converters typically employ a unit-element architecture to drive out the analog signal. Performance can suffer from errors due to mismatch between unit elements, leading to a sharp drop in the achievable signal-to- noise ratio (SNR). Mismatch noise shaping is an established technique for overcoming these limitations, but usually anchors the signal band to a fixed location. In order to extend these advantages to tunable applications, this paper presents a novel technique that allows the mismatch noise shaping transfer function to have an adjustable center frequency.

Edit-2011: The paper is now available on IEEExplore.

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Visit to Itaipu Dam

As part of the LASCAS symposium, the organizers had planned a visit to Itaipu Dam. Built on the Paraná River, this massive hydroelectric power plant was a joint project between Brazil and Paraguay, with the purpose of serving the power needs of both countries. We got an extensive tour of the internals of the dam, including the production building, outflow channel and central command stations. The control room was quite fascinating, with live activity and monitoring as we filed in and out of the viewing rooms.

Most of the symposium participants took advantage of this opportunity, and made up quite a large tour-group. It took a while to reach the central control buildings as we had to pass through security gates and drive over part of the structure (the dam has a total length of 7.235 km). We walked through the gigantic structure and tried to imagine the size of each of the 20 turbines required to generate 14,000 MW. We were informed that the dam produces 90% of Paraguay’s electricity and 25% of Brazil’s. At peak production, a mind-boggling 62,200 cubic meters of water flows through the structure every second.

Rounding off the evening was short talk and light-show projected against the walls of the dam, as viewed from a not-too-distant amphitheater no doubt created for propaganda and other such events. The tour message was overwhelmingly favorable towards the project. In reality, the local communities paid a high price in order to accomodate the enormous size of the reservoir (29 billion cubic meters), including the displacement of over 10,000 families and the permanent destruction of Guaíra Falls (the worlds largest waterfall by volume) and the Guaíra Falls National Park, as well as the extinction of some rare plant types.

From an engineering perspective, I appreciated the sheer scale of the structure. As a human being, I felt sad for the loss and destruction. On the whole, the visit was quite an experience.

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This morning, I presented my paper titled An Architecture for First-Order Tunable Mismatch Shaping in Oversampled Data Converters at the 2010 IEEE Latin American Symposium on Circuits and Systems (LASCAS) taking place in Iguaçu Falls, Brazil. Coupled with the sister conference IBERCHIP, the organization and execution of this inaugural LASCAS symposium was impressed. The conference program can be found here (pdf). My paper was part of an interesting session on data converters (L2: Data Converters).

From the abstract:

Mismatch shaping is a commonly used technique for shaping the noise created by mismatch errors in over-sampled digital-to-analog converters. Mismatch shaping techniques reported thus far operate with the signal band located at a fixed frequency. This paper presents a simple architecture for arbitrarily tuning the center frequency of a first-order mismatch shaping transfer function. Details of hardware implementation are provided, and the hardware complexity is analyzed. Results from simulations show a consistently improved signal-to-noise ratio at tuning frequency settings across the entire Nyquist bandwidth.

Edit: A pre-publication version of the paper can be downloaded here (pdf).

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Another of my papers has been accepted at a conference, this time for presentation at the 2010 IEEE Latin American Symposium on Circuits and Systems (LASCAS), taking place from February 24-26, 2010. Co-authored with my doctoral adviser, Prof. Earl E. Swartzlander, Jr., the paper is titled An Architecture for First-Order Tunable Mismatch Shaping in Oversampled Data Converters and provides details about a specific hardware implementation of a tunable first-order mismatch shaper.

The location of the symposium is extremely attractive: Iguaçu Falls in Brazil. I’m looking forward to exploring the Iguaçu National Park, visiting the Parque Das Aves and making a trip to Itaipu Dam.

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